Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team Training

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ training program has a simple goal: To facilitate a learning experience helping professionals and their organizations learn what it takes to build a truly cohesive and great team. The Five Behaviors™ profile provides both individual and team feedback; it is grounded in the model described in The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, the internationally best-selling leadership fable by Patrick Lencioni. Participants learn how they score as a team on the key components of the model: trust, conflict, commitment, accountability, and results. Also, the program is powered by Everything DiSC®, an adaptive assessment model that helps people better understand themselves and others. By applying what they learn and using these results, members will be able to develop more effective team characteristics and create a better, stronger team.

1. Trust

The Foundation Starts with Trust

When members of the team are transparent and honest and are willing to be completely vulnerable with one another only then is there trust with one another and the team. Vulnerability-based Trust is when your team feels completely safe and confident with their peers. In other words, they do not feel they have to be protective or careful around one another. 

How Do We Become a Team with Vulnerability-Based Trust?

By having your team take the Everything DiSC® assessment, it is like a decoder into the person’s preferences and tendencies which are primarily their work style.  The assessment gives a person a deeper knowledge of themselves and also of their peers. By understanding each other’s work style we can build more productive relationships.

 2. Conflict

Healthy Conflict is an Important Part of Trust

While many do not like conflict, it is important to understand that the results we get from passionate debates within a team are necessary for the team to be great. For any lasting relationship to grow and prosper, it requires productive conflict.

When team members have a solid foundation with vulnerability-based trust, they understand that conflict is just something you go through to find the best possible solution. Conflict is a positive and productive way to get to the best solution in the shortest time.

3. Commitment

Getting Buy in Even When They Do Not Agree

A cohesive team gains commitment and clarity around decisions and gets the buy-in of all team members to move forward on the decision including anyone that may not initially have had buy-in. Great teams know that they must be able as a team to commit even if the outcome is not sure and even when not everyone agrees.

How do Different DiSC® Styles Approach Commitment?

D – Have a take-charge style and quickly make decisions

i – Like personal relationships and enjoy working within a team

S – Careful decision-makers and have to accurate before they commit

C – Swayed by objective information, not emotion or intuition

4. Accountability

Peer Pressure

Effective teams do not tolerate making each other uncomfortable or calling each other out. Instead, they enter the danger zone with each other, together as a team. Applying peer pressure is a good thing in a workplace team by giving the team members the sense of trust and respect to get it done right.

DiSC Styles Tend to Prefer Receiving Productive Feedback in Different Ways:

D – Want a short, straightforward answer 

i – Want a positive explanation

S – Prefer a direct but considerate delivery

C – They need time to think and accuracy

5. Results

Being Focused and Accountable

The results are what happen after encouraging trust, healthy conflict, commitment, and accountability. Interestingly it is one of the greatest challenges for a team success the inattention to outcome-based results.

Don’t All Teams Work Toward Results?

One would believe that the natural driving force behind a team would be the results. However, sometimes either the team’s status or their individual goals prevent that from being the focus. A focus on team status is when merely just being part of a group is satisfying enough, regardless of the end results. Individual status is when the familiar tendency of people to focus on their own positions or career opportunities at the expense of their team.
So the emphasis needs to be on the team’s collective results. Great teams make sure that everyone, are doing whatever they need to do to help the team accomplish its goals.

Product Development Centered on You the Customer

We believe that our extensive product development process is the secret to our success. We research, and storyboard, then we build a full working prototype, we ask questions to get extensive workshop feedback (from our actual participants going through a program), and then…well, we start the process all over again. Moreover, for each product we offer, we do this again and again until we get it right. Yes, it is hard and time-consuming, but we do it this way because we know it is the only way to ensure that in the end the learner’s experience is as powerful and meaningful as it can be. We are radically customer-focused in our process and how we do it every step of the way.

So How Did We Come Up with The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team program?

This program grew out of a decade-long relationship with Patrick Lencioni and his colleagues at The Table Group. During our development process, in order to get the results we wanted we tested, retested and refined the program with 300+ teams and 3,500 team members to make it what it is today.

Is this a Validated Assessment?

In the end, the participant has to agree with their assessment results. Moreover, while we know that most assessments in our industry are only tested for their internal reliability, we took it a few steps further. We looked at things that you do not see like test and retest (the stability of the tool), and the correlations with other respected instruments, the correlations with outside observer ratings, and the correlations with actual work behavior. It is a significant investment, but it is this information and data that allows us the ability to refine the assessment and make sure we are getting the participant the most accurate results possible. We believe that making the assessment right is our very first job.

Before You Begin:

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ training and assessment was designed to be used with an intact team. Please consider these questions before committing to this program:

Is the Team Really a TEAM?

We define a team as a small number of people (three to twelve) that meet regularly and are collectively responsible for the end results. The team shares common goals, responsibilities for achieving them and all of the rewards. A group of people does not make a team. For example, a group that looks like a team might simply be a group of individuals reporting to the same manager, but who may have little interdependence and mutual accountability. If a group does not meet the criteria outlined above as those of an actual team, this training is unlikely to produce the results you are expecting.

Is this Team Ready for “Heavy Lifting”?

The advantages of being a high-functioning team are enormous. But they can only be achieved
if the team is willing to invest considerable time and emotional energy in the process. It won’t
work if the team is interested only in shortcuts and half-measures.

Is the Leader Truly Committed to Building a Team?

The fact is, leadership matters. For a team to be successful, the leader must understand the power of teamwork and be prepared to lead the effort in terms of setting an example and dedicating time to it. Still, it’s important to note that many leaders who seem uninterested in teamwork are often just skeptical about the possibility of achieving it or afraid that acknowledging the need for it might reflect poorly on them. In these cases, success is possible as long as team leaders are willing to start the process with good intentions.

Is this the Right Time?

Certain situations make it difficult to effectively implement the feedback process. We suggest that you reconsider conducting the sessions if any of the following situations exist:

  • The team is very new. A team should have been together for a minimum of six to eight weeks prior to utilizing this assessment. For new teams, it would be better just to introduce the model and discuss the behaviors of a cohesive team.
  • There is about to be a change in the nature of the team. The time is probably not right if a team member will be leaving or the team’s responsibilities are about to change significantly. In those situations, it would be better just to give a presentation on the model and then wait to conduct the assessment until the team is stable.
  • There is going to be or recently has been a significant organizational change, such as a merger, a reorganization, or a new CEO.
  • The team has an unusually heavy workload with impending deadlines.

What does this Program Include?

Profile

  • An easy to read 36-page highly personalized assessment results for the individual and team
  • Strong visuals that demonstrate and illustrate key messages
  • Context-specific feedback
  • Tips and strategies for improving teamwork effectiveness
  • Opportunity for building an action plan

The Program is facilitated in Seven modules

Seven modules are each 1 – 3 ½ hours in length. Each module includes: A facilitator’s Guide in MS Word, Participants handouts in MS Word and A PowerPoint® presentation with an embedded video

  • Module 1: Introduction – Introduces the Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team Model
  • Module 2: Building Trust – Teaches the concept of vulnerability-based trust
  • Module 3: Mastering Conflict – Helps you understand the benefits of healthy conflict
  • Module 4: Achieving Commitment – How clarity and buy-in are key to achieving commitment
  • Module 5: Embracing Accountability – Stresses the importance of peer-to-peer accountability
  • Module 6: Focusing on Results – Collective results are more important than individual goals
  • Module 7: Review and Action Plan – Review what they learned and create an action plan to improve the team’s productivity

For those that want to facilitate the program on their own, you will find that the Facilitator’s Guide is easy to read, understand and fully scripted. It includes all supporting presentation materials and participant handouts that are needed for the program. Through the use of experiential activities, video, and discussion, an intact team is led through the powerful The Five Behaviors model, learning and practicing the behaviors that will make the team more cohesive and improve its performance.

Please note: team member profiles are purchased separately.

What is an Annotated Team Report?

This is a tool used by the facilitator in preparation for the team session. The report has a copy of the team profile with the following notations:

  • Expanded explanation of profile content
  • Scoring interpretation
  • Resources for additional informationndicators of personalized/tailored content

 Also, there is an appendix that includes a ranking of all assessment items by the team average and then the team’s percentile for each of The Five Behaviors.
Please note: team member profiles are purchased separately.

Is it Easily Customizable?

You can create an end-to-end teamwork development program, or you can concentrate on specific areas. Also, you can switch out video clips and modify the Facilitator’s Guide, PowerPoint® slides, and handouts. This allows you to add or delete sections to fit any time frame.

Podcasts

  • Hear how to interpret The Five Behaviors reports so that you can easily and thoroughly answer participant questions. You gain insightful information from our Director of Research that you cannot find anywhere else. The podcast is broken up into short clips that cover The Five Behaviors model, the team profile, and the Annotated Team Report.

Progress Reports

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ Progress Report is for teams who have already taken the original The Five Behaviors™ assessment. The Progress Report measures the team’s progress by graphically comparing how a team’s performance changed over time.
The Progress Report highlights areas of the greatest improvement and decline; it provides points for discussion and an action plan to help teams prioritize and set specific goals. You’ll be able to compare how a team’s performance has changed over a period and be able to highlight areas of greatest improvement and areas of most significant decline.

Included in the Reports:

  • Team is Survey Results
  • Points of Discussion
  • Action Plan
    • Identify the team priorities for improvements
    • Set specific goals
  • Appendix
    • Impact of Your DiSC® Style
    • Everything DiSC® Team Map
    • Conflict Team Map
Who should take this program?

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ Progress Report is for teams who have already taken the original The Five Behaviors™ assessment. The Progress Report measures the team’s progress by graphically comparing how a team’s performance changed over time.

The Progress Report highlights areas of the greatest improvement and decline; it provides points for discussion and an action plan to help teams prioritize and set specific goals. You’ll be able to compare how a team’s performance has changed over a period and be able to highlight areas of greatest improvement and areas of most significant decline.

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ Progress Report is for teams who have already taken the original The Five Behaviors™ assessment. The Progress Report measures the team’s progress by graphically comparing how a team’s performance changed over time.

The Progress Report highlights areas of the greatest improvement and decline; it provides points for discussion and an action plan to help teams prioritize and set specific goals. You’ll be able to compare how a team’s performance has changed over a period and be able to highlight areas of greatest improvement and areas of most significant decline.

Here are the best practices for using this tool
  • Before using this tool, give team members enough time to implement the action plans they created and committed. We recommend a good timeframe be 6–12 months after they take the original assessment before measuring their progress.
  • Keep in mind, once you run a Progress Report, every report run after that is compared to the previous Progress Report—not the original report.
  • Look at the numbers along with the colors in the pyramid to gauge improvement since the colors only tell part of the story. Keep in mind that lower scores do not necessarily mean things are getting worse; you may find that people may be a bit more honest when they are answering the questions the second time around, which then could make some scores go down.
  • Review the model first with the team before you hand them the report. We know that as soon as the team members get the report in their hands, they always go straight to the numbers, so you’ll want to explain that the report is designed to serve as a conversation starter regarding where the team is and where they would like to be.
When do I use the Progress Report versus starting over?

If there is a new leader of the team, we recommend the team re-take the original Five Behaviors™ assessment. Additionally, if the team has changed by 40% or more since the first assessment was completed, we recommend re-administering the assessment and having the team create new action plans for improvement. Then in roughly 6–12 months, you could re-administer The Progress Report and assess the team’s progress.

How long does a Progress Report session take?

A typical session is likely to last 2–4 hours; however, the timing will depend on the goals of you the facilitator and also the needs of the team.

What if a new member joins the team?

If one or two people has joined the team since the original assessment was done, you can still add their data to The Progress Report. Just note that these members will have a longer assessment experience, they will be taking the DiSC® portion to receive their DiSC® narrative and then it is added to the DiSC® Team Map and Conflict Map. They will answer questions about the team and will receive their own Progress Report. You have the option to import DiSC® data from any Everything DiSC® assessment into The Progress Report. You may want to recommend to the new team members that they read The Five Dysfunctions of a Team so they can get a deeper understanding of the model. Alternatively, you could meet separately to bring new team members up to speed before any engagement with the whole team.

Does every team member get an individual report?

Yes, each team member receives a personalized report. It includes the person’s DiSC® style and narrative from the original report in addition to outlining the team progress. Plus it includes the updated DiSC® Team Map and Conflict Team Map.

How does someone get trained to use the Progress Report?

Ask us about taking The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ Facilitator Accreditation course.

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